A Pasadena Employment Law Firm

Committed to Helping Workers

Phone

(626) 380-9000

  • Sick employee at work

    California just made history as the second state to require paid sick days for employees! On August 30, 2014, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law the Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act of 2014.

    Employees will get three days of sick leave (24 hours) per year

    Starting July 1, 2015, employees in California who work for 30 or more days within a year will be entitled to paid sick leave. They will accrue paid sick time at a rate of one hour per 30 hours worked, to a maximum of 24 hours or 3 days per year. Employees will be permitted to use the time off beginning on the 90th day of employment.

    When can paid sick leave be used?

    An employee will be able to use the paid sick time for:

    1. The employee’s own care – whether for diagnosis, care, or treatment of an existing health condition or for preventive care;
    2. Care for the employee’s child, parent, spouse, domestic partner, grandparent, grandchild, or sibling – whether for an existing health condition or for preventive care; and
    3. Certain uses by an employee who is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking.

    Logistics of Using Paid Sick Leave

  • podium

    On August 22, 2014, Ramit Mizrahi will be speaking about pre-litigation case investigations and considerations in preparing complaints. She will be speaking alongside Cameron Fox of Paul Hastings LLP. The program will be part of a Bridgeport continuing education event titled Litigating Discrimination & Harassment Claims.

    Date and time: August 22, 2014, at 9:05 a.m.

    Location: Millennium Biltmore Hotel, 506 S Grand Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90071

  • On July 14, 2014, Ramit Mizrahi will be speaking about pregnancy rights and accommodations at the Orange County Bar Association Labor and Employment Section meeting. She will be speaking alongside Nancy Inesta, partner at Baker & Hostetler LLP.

    Here are the details:

    Pregnancy and Beyond: Understanding Workplace Accommodation, Leave, and Lactation Rights

    Description: Multiple laws and regulations protect pregnant women and new mothers in the workplace. Recent regulations and cases have further clarified and expanded upon employers’ obligations to provide accommodations and protections. This panel will cover the most frequent issues that arise in the workplace from early pregnancy through the postpartum period. The panel will address requests for accommodations and transfers both during pregnancy and in the post-postpartum period; pregnancy, childbirth, and baby-bonding leave coverage; understanding job-protected leave vs. paid leave via the EDD; and lactation-related accommodations.

    Date and time: July 14, 2014, 12 p.m.

    Location: Radisson Hotel, 4545 MacArthur Blvd., Newport Beach, CA 92660

    To register . . . .

  • Family Celebrates 10 years of PFL

    Happy tenth birthday to California’s Paid Family Leave Law! Paid Family Leave (PFL) first went into effect ten years ago today on July 1, 2004. For the past decade, most California workers have been entitled to paid leave when they take time off of work to care for a seriously ill parent, spouse, or child. Coverage was also expanded to cover care for a domestic partner. In addition, parents are entitled to paid leave to bond with a new baby during that first year or to connect with an adopted or foster child.

    With paid family leave, California workers don’t have to choose between caring for a sick loved one and making ends meet. PFL provides for up to six weeks of wage replacement at about 55% of your pay, up to $1067 per week-through California’s Employment Development Department (EDD).

    Today is a special day for PFLL for a second reason: the law, thanks to the passage of SB 770 last year, now provides you with paid leave if you take time off to care for . . . .

  • Dollar on a scale

    In California, we are fortunate to have a state minimum wage that is higher than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. California’s minimum wage applies to nearly all workers in the State, with limited exceptions. On July 1, 2014, California’s minimum wage will increase to $9.00 an hour. It will increase again to $10 an hour on January 1, 2016.

    I have written before about how important it is to . . .

  • Employees hands tied with noncompete agreement

    Can your employer stop you from going to work for a competitor? In California, the answer is probably no.

    What Are Non-Compete Agreements?

    When an employee starts a new job, he is usually presented with a flurry of paperwork to fill out and sign. Usually, the employee has little time to read everything–and doesn’t. One of the things that is often buried among the other documents is an agreement that the employee won’t later compete with the employer. Such a document, often called a “non-compete agreement” or “covenant not to compete,” seeks a promise from the employee that he won’t later go work for a competitor or start his own business in the same area. Employees often sign these agreements without realizing the devastating impact that they can have. . . .

  • unsigned severance agreement

    Employers often offer severance payments to employees who are terminated or laid off. The payments usually come with strings attached; mainly, that employees must give up all rights to sue the employer for any claims that they may have. Employees may be required to sign lengthy severance agreements with complicated terms and conditions to receive their payment.

    If you are provided with a severance agreement, you must think carefully before signing it. You are well-advised to consult with an experienced employment lawyer to help make an informed decision. A lawyer can help you understand the legal rights you are giving up. They can explain [ . . . ]

  • As I argued last week in my blog post on CELA Voice, we’re spending more time telling women how to navigate around bias in the workplace than we are trying to fix it. In the second post of the series, titled Organizations have the power to reduce unconscious bias, I explain how employers can reduce the effects of bias in their workplace. Many mistakenly believe that it would be too hard or take too […]

  • Female programmers defy stereotypes

    We’ve had a surge of self-help articles and books telling women how they should act if they want to advance in the workplace. For example, women are told to “lean in,” “be more confident,” and “ask for a raise, but do it in a way that is ‘feminine’ so you don’t come off as demanding or unlikeable.”

    Sex discrimination has been illegal for fifty years. Rather than telling women how to navigate a biased system, shouldn’t we focus on how to stop the bias in the first place?

    Ramit’s two-part series, published in the CELA Voice Blog, addresses implicit biases, how they hurt women in the workplace, and what employers can do to reduce their effects. . . .

  • A stack of employment records

    So you think you have an employment discrimination or wrongful termination case and are looking to hire a lawyer. Just as you must evaluate the lawyer to decide if they are right for you, the lawyer must assess your legal claims to determine whether they should represent you. Once you have gone through the preliminary consultation and conflict check, the lawyer will likely schedule an in-person meeting to delve into your claims in greater detail. The more information you have readily available, the more easily an employment lawyer can assess your claims. Of course, that does not mean you should bring with you every scrap of paper conceivable! Below, I describe some of the documents you should bring with you to help the consulting lawyer evaluate your case.

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