A Pasadena Employment Law Firm

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  • The September 2020 issue of the California Labor & Employment Law Review features Ramit Mizrahi’s article, titled “Same Ocean, Different Boats: The Pandemic’s Disproportionate Impact on Certain Workers, Employment Law’s Protections, and Its Limitations.” The article explores which workers have been most affected by the pandemic, where employment law serves to protect them, and where we must look outside of employment law to support those most in need.

    Click on the below image to read the article in full.

    Cover of September 2020 Labor & Employment Law Review Issue

  • Little girl visits her father in the hospital

    Last week, on September 9, Governor Newsom signed AB-1867 into law. AB-1867, effective immediately, makes sure that all California employees are eligible for COVID-19-related supplemental paid sick leave (“SPSL”) by filling in the gaps lefts by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”). The FFCRA provides for 2 weeks of COVID-19-related paid sick leave for eligible employees. However, it only applies to employers with fewer than 500 employees. It further allows employers of certain health care providers or emergency responders to elect to exempt them from FFCRA protections. In fact, it is estimated that the FFCRA leaves out up to 80% of the workforce.

  • podium

    On September 25, 2020, Ramit Mizrahi will be speaking about recent California employment law legislation at the California Lawyers Association’s 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting.

    Here are the details:

    California Employment Law Legislative Update

    Description: From a sea change in the legality of contract labor requirements to special issues around remote working and the need for workplace safety in the COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 has shaped up to be an exciting year for employment law. Our panelists will provide employee and management-side perspectives on the newly passed California employment laws and other developments, and the impact they will have on workplaces, including an update on the ever-changing landscape of AB-5 changes to contract labor requirements.

  • son and father enjoying family leave
    Update: Governor Newsom signed SB-1383 into law on September 17, 2020.

    On August 31, 2020, two minutes before the end of the 2019–2020 legislative session, the California Legislature passed Senate Bill 1383. SB 1383, if signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom, will be a game-changer for the millions of California workers working for small employers who will become eligible for job-protected family and medical leave under the California Family Rights Act (“CFRA”).

    SB 1383 does two main things:

    1. It expands CFRA coverage to all employers with five or more employees, down from 50.
    2. It allows CFRA leave to be used to provide care for grandparents, grandchildren, siblings, parents-in-law, domestic partners, adult children, and children of domestic partners.

    We expect that Governor Gavin Newsom will sign the bill into law given his commitment to expanding paid family leave.

    This blog post discusses the changes to the CFRA created by SB 1383.

  • Applause

    Ramit Mizrahi has been recognized in U.S News & World Report’s 2021 Edition of The Best Lawyers in America© for her work in employment law representing individuals.

    Ms. Mizrahi has also been selected to the 2021 Southern California Super Lawyers® list, again for her work in employment law representing individuals.

    Both honors reflect peer recognition of excellence in practice.

    This marks the ninth year that Ms. Mizrahi has been recognized by Super Lawyers®, including having previously been distinguished as being among the top 100 Rising Stars and top 50 Rising Stars women for three consecutive years.

    Ms. Mizrahi and the Mizrahi Law team remain committed to serving as tenacious advocates for the firm’s clients while working to build collegiality and community in the legal profession.

  • With many businesses closing or shifting to virtual work due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, it can be confusing as a worker to understand what the laws are surrounding your rights and benefits as an employee. Below is a summary of protections and wage-replacement options available to employees in various scenarios related to coronavirus.

  • The January 2020 issue of the California Lawyers Association’s Labor & Employment Law Review features an article authored by Ramit Mizrahi, Andrew Friedman, and Tony Oncidi.

    The article—”The Top Employment Cases of 2019″—highlights the most important California state and federal employment cases from last year. Click on the below image to read the article in full.

    Image of Labor and Employment Law Article

  • podium

    On February 6, 2020, Ramit Mizrahi will be speaking about leave law rights at the California Lawyers Association’s Employment Law 101—Fundamentals for the New Employment Practitioner conference.

    Here are the details:

    Leaves of Absence—Review of All Leaves and Special Focus on FMLA/CFRA/PDL

    Description: California’s leave laws are among the most difficult for employers to comply with and manage. In this module, panelists will discuss the Family Medical Leave Act, the
    California Family Rights Act, Pregnancy Disability Leave, and various other leaves impacting California employers. Special consideration will be given to the interplay of the various leaves and the potential pitfalls.

    Date and time: February 6, 2020, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    Location: St. Anne’s Conference Center, 155 N. Occidental Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90026

    To register, click here.

  • Dollar on a scale

    The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25 per hour for over a decade–not enough to keep a family of two above the federal poverty line. In an effort to keep people out of poverty, twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia have set their own minimum wage, as have numerous cities and counties. Here in California, we are moving toward a $15 per hour minimum wage for all workers by 2023; Los Angeles will reach a $15 per hour minimum wage for all workers by July 2021. Details about the Los Angeles and California minimum wages can be found in this post.

    Today, the Washington Post reported on powerful new research published in the Journal of Epidemology & Community Health, which found that a $1 increase in the minimum wages was linked to a 3.4–5.9% decrease in the suicide rate among adults with a high school education or less. The largest effects were found when unemployment rates were high.

    In the United States, suicide accounts for approximately 19% of deaths in adults ages 18 to 24 and 11% of deaths in adults ages 25 to 44. Financial stressors are often a factor. For example, the report cited research that “an estimated 1.7% of unemployed US adults attempted suicide in 2017, compared with 0.4% of those working full-time and 0.7% for those working part-time.”

    The report estimates that, between 2009 and 2015, 13,800 suicides could have been prevented among those ages 18–64 years with a high school education or less given an increase in the minimum wage equivalent to $1 above prevailing levels; a $2 increase could have prevented 25,900 suicides.

    I have written many times about the importance of raising the minimum wage and creating a social safety net for those in need (for example, here, here, and here). Indeed, my master’s thesis was about single mothers, poverty, and the minimum wage. This new research shows just how important it is that we ensure that workers can make a living wage to support themselves and their families.

  • 2020 on pink background

    We at Mizrahi Law wish you a Happy New Year!

    We are very much looking forward to the new year. 2020 stands to be a terrific year for California employees, with some exciting new employment laws going into effect on January 1!

    In addition, the State minimum wage increases on January 1 to $13 per hour for large employers (26 or more employees) and $12 per hour for small employers (25 or fewer employees). The City of Los Angeles minimum wage, currently set at $14.25 per hour for large employers and $13.25 for small employers, will increase to $15 per hour and $14.25 per hour, respectively, on July 1, 2020.

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